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25 December 2005

Wireless use at work

From the National Post WORKING section

From the "Don't have a clue - PHB department
Once a month, tens of thousands of Canadian workers -- from executives to rookie salespeople -- face the challenge of having to file expenses for cellphone calls, wireless notebooks and personal digital assistants on devices they own, but used for company business. Perhaps an even greater number, daunted by the task, do not bother...Full story

The result is a subsidy to Canadian business, paid out of employees' pockets, industry observers say. And the reason is simple: Consumers have embraced wireless technology but Canadian business seems firmly anchored to landlines.
50% of employees prefer cellphones and other wireless devices and use them regularly for work. Employers meanwhile do not believe them: 24% of them say their staff uses cellphones regularly and only 10% say employees use wireless computers for work.


To me - the most interesting part of the story is this little gem:

"When it comes to adoption by business, carriers are the choke point. They are just awful when it comes to dealing with business accounts," says Ian Angus of Angus Telemanagement Group....Despite two weeks of repeated requests, Bell Canada refused interviews on what others see as its shortfall in wireless business services.


So not only do the big wireless companies not look at what they can provide - but they even refuse to talk about the problem. One thing I've noticed in my wanderings around the net is that there are hundreds of wireless cellphones, PDA's, etc. that provide these services and more coming out each month. But the big Canadian Wireless companies are months behind in getting in these phones on their systems. And a lot of the devices I've seen will never be seen here because they won't deal with the manufacturer. (Just try to get a Motorola RAZUR here from Bell.)

Of course - I blame the manufacturers as well - for signing exclusive agreements for the entire company with one carrier.

And don't get me started on Number portability - the only reason it's so long in coming to Canada is pure political pressure on the CRTC from the big guys.
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